DCPS Chapter 25 - Columbia Heights Educational Campus

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STUDENT FAIR ACCESS TO SCHOOL ACT AND DCMR - CHAPTER 25 TITLE 5: STUDENT DISCIPLINE


At DCPS, we are committed to educating the whole child by providing rigorous, joyful, and inclusive academic and social emotional learning experiences to ensure all students are college and career ready. A key component of this is work is creating safe, supportive, and inclusive learning environments for both students and staff. We believe that the focus on educating the whole child will help to ensure an environment where all can grow and learn in order to become our best selves.

STUDENT FAIR ACCESS TO SCHOOL ACT

In May 2018, the DC Council passed the Student Fair Access to School Act, which was reviewed by the Mayor and enacted on July 12, 2018. This new law requires changes to DCPS student discipline policies over the course of three school years. Most significantly, beginning in school year 2018-2019, the Act places restrictions on the number of consecutive and cumulative days in any out-of-school suspension that students can receive:

  • Students in grades K-5 cannot receive an out-of-school suspension for a single discipline incident that exceeds 5 consecutive days.*
  • Students in grades 6-12 cannot receive an out-of-school suspension for a single discipline incident that exceeds 10 consecutive days.*
  • Students in grades K-12 cannot receive more than 20 cumulative days of out-of-school suspension, unless the Chancellor provides a written justification to the student and parent describing why exceeding the 20-day limit is a more appropriate disciplinary action than alternative responses; or the student's conduct necessitated an emergency removal, and the Chancellor provides a written justification for the emergency removal to the student and parent.*

*The exception to the above requirements is if a student violates the Gun Free Schools Act. This federal law requires all schools to expel a student, who is determined to have brought a firearm to a school, or to have possessed a firearm at a school, from attending school for a period of not less than 1 year. The Chancellor can modify the expulsion requirement


OUR COMMITMENT
 

As part of our commitment to creating joyful learning environments, DCPS commissioned a review of discipline policies, procedures, and practices at 10 schools during school years 15-16 and 16-17. The goal of this review was to inform areas where we can collectively improve systems and supports for schools, staff, and students concerning discipline matters. DCPS is also developing a Behavior Task Force to ensure that school communities are best positioned to develop safe, supportive, and nurturing learning environments. More specifically, in school year 18-19 we are:

  • Increasing the quality and frequency of supports for all staff that support school-wide behavior to include principals, assistant principals, deans, behavior tech, and special education staff. For example:

      • Schools will focus on embedding social-emotional learning and restorative practices into their school-level policies, practices, and classroom experiences;
      • All teachers are participating in professional development through LEAP, that supports the creation of a nurturing and engaging classroom;
      • A cohort of 15 DCPS assistant principals will collaborate with 15 assistant principals from DC charter schools to explore and expand trauma-informed practices.

  • Assessing our current discipline data management systems to determine their capacity to provide accurate, timely data that can be used to impact discipline trends.
  • Developing a monitoring framework that provides frequent touch points for principals and central office staff to review discipline data for accuracy and trends that might suggest data integrity issues.


IMPORTANT ATTACHMENTS
ACE Mentoring Program
Akin Gum Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP
Arent Fox LLP
Bancroft Foundation
Brainfood
British Council
BUILD Metro DC
Camp Horizons
Catalogue for Philanthropy
CityBridge Foundation
Collaborative Solutions for Communities
COSEBOC
Courtyard by Marriott Convention Center
CSOSA
D.C. College Access Program (DC-CAP)
D.C. Department of Health and Human Services
D.C. Office of Early Childhoon Education
D.C. Office of the State Superintendent of Education
D.C. Public Schools
Denihan Hospitality Group
U.S. Department of Agriculture
U.S. Department of Education
U.S. Department of Energy
U.S. Department the Treasury
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Embassy of France
Embassy of Italy
Embassy of the United Arab Emirates
Gala Hispanic Theatre
George Washington University
Global Kids
Flamboyan Foundation

Hilton Worldwide
Hotel Association of Washington, D.C.
Howard University
Inter-American Development Bank
Justice Grants Administration
The Kennedy Center
LaSalle Hotel Properties
Lois and Richard England Family Foundation
The J. Willard and Alice S. Marriott Foundation
Richard E. and Nancy P. Marriott Foundation
University of Maryland – College Park
Mayor’s Office on Latino Affairs
Montgomery College
MITRE
UnidosUS
National Symphony Orchestra
Office of the Director of National Intelligence
Rotary Club of Washington, DC
Residence Inn Marriott
SER-Jobs for Progress
State Farm
Sutherland
University of the District of Columbia
Urban Alliance
Wilderness Leadership and Learning
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